click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121121
20121129
STATION
MSNBCW 23
CSPAN 21
CSPAN2 20
CNNW 4
KQED (PBS) 4
SFGTV 4
KNTV (NBC) 3
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 3
KQEH (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
SFGTV2 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 109
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)
mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his law degree from harvard law school. prior to this public service, the justice served in private practice in san francisco and sacramento. i can attest to his prowess as an attorney because on one very interesting occasion, he represented me. [laughter] on a speeding ticket. [laughter] and got me off with a mi
democrats. in april 2011, a law took affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from parks to marketplaces to shops. although the law does not mention the words women, muslim, boar can, or even israelied, it was introduced by president as a ban on muslim vailing which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law rear renders. have adopted some type of restriction. on april 28, 2011, the belgium voted far similar ban although the law is expected to be challenged before the constitutional court. in spain, in 2010, the say -- in all public places reversing an earlier vote supporting the ban. similar laws in progress in italy as well. in switzerland, after at campaign designed to aappeal to fears of the muslim takeover. a popular referendum voted by 57% to ban the construction of -- [inaudible] associated with the mosques. despite the fact that very few mosques in switzerland have them. they are only four in the whole country out of 150 mosques. and that in consequence, the architect issue is cl
? >> it would be much larger constituency about creating that device. >> beyond that, law enforcement has other techniques. they do not need a special device. there is still reckless driving on the books, the power of the nation -- of observation and other evidence that can be relied upon. the same outcome to restrict -- >> can odor be introduced as evidence? rex the officers perception of an odor can. some potential evidence. >> talking about regulating the illegal drugs, they mentioned that 80% of the position painkillers in the world are sold in the united states. five percent of the population of the world's 80% of the world's painkillers. drug related overdoses for death -- close to 70% were from prescription drugs. even the drugs that we regulate -- we do not seem to be doing too good of a drug -- of a job at a lot of people are dying to reque. >> we would not have any car fatalities if there were no cars. i do not need to make light of what you're saying but the fact that failure of the peace and not condemn the value that exists for these other off -- these other. this brings up a large
particular case whether a person is an automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that i
with supreme court justice anthony kennedy. and then yale law professor talks about how president obama stance on same-sex marriage. this week on "newsmakers, "president of the service employees international union talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for in budget negotiations. can see "newsmakers" at 10:00 a.m. >> what about if the soviet union announces tomorrow but if we attack cuba, it is going to be nuclear war? >> serious things here, we're .oing to be uneasy p >> something may make these people should off. -- shoot it off. i would want to make my own people very alert. >> it is a fascinating moment. it is amazing that eisenhower tells him to have a people alert. of course people are alert. kennedy laps. then he says, -- laughs. then he says, hang on tight. they're able to joke a little bit with each other. especially during this crisis, the had a sense of how lonely it is to occupy that office and i were getting all kinds of a device, good advice, a lot of faulty advice, which kennedy was. eisenhower knew all about faulty military advice. he is able to speak with supreme a
for 35 years. he was the president back then, too, of the harvard law review. we had -- we are used to holding the reins of power. a chief justice also holds the reins of power. the only difference is that a chief justice must hold them lightly, lest he discovered they are not allowed the -- attached to anything. nevertheless, i know some long and personal experience that david brings to rice, a special vision, telecom and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be here. i am pleased that they invited me to visit rice as part of the centennial celebration of the university's foundation, and i extend my sincere congratulations to the trustees, the faculty, students, and alumni on your first great century. the founding of a new university is always an historic occasion, but the founding ceremony for rice was truly extraordinary. i went back to read the newspaper accounts from october, 1912, that recorded the event. the papers reported that the distinguished first president of rice invited 150 pronounced scholars from around the worl
're not impeding traffic or doing anything else to violate the law, there's no problem here. >> an interesting story. and that is it. from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, i'm martin savidge. atlanta, i'm martin savidge. have a good night. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> this is a drug overdose call. >> every 19 minutes in the united states, someone dies of an accidental overdose. >> this is crazy. not a single solitary one of these people has to die. >> we are used to think of it starting here, looking like this but something happened in this country. and now, increasingly, it starts here, in your own home. >> as we speak, someone is dying, right now. >> and over the next hour, three people will die. >> he went to sleep and he had no idea this was gonna be his last night on earth. >> from misusing perfectly legal prescription drugs. taking a deadly dose. >> poise center, this is debra. >> i'm a little concern had that may have taken something that wasn't good for me on accident. [ phone ringing ] >> i took a few methadone from my grandpa. they were 10 milligrams. >> what you are l
of cases he mentions jefferson was a good master and jefferson's son-in-law, who ran things around here when jefferson was away, was in charge, kind of an accident overseer. colonel randolph and going through the records i found that colonel randolph when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter, maria and salted -- soldier to an overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac did mention that in his memoir. why? i really don't know. maybe he told his interviewer and the interviewer to want to write it down. maybe isaac did what to say anything about hurt feelings of a white. maybe it hasn't left an impression on you just don't know and it leads like you guys had a lot of music that we really don't know and that the psychological, possible psychological distortions that took place under slavery is something we are still wrestling with. another person's memoirs are spent a lot of time with were those of peter fossae. he left to memoirs. he gave new super entities in the late 1800 -- 1800s rather. he was born here and was one of the slaves
. >>> on december 19, 2011, benjamin gupta, a law and mba student at george washington university died suddenly. mysteriously. he's no relationship to me, but when his family got word, they spent hours trading phone calls. they were in stunned disbelief. >> there was a message from his mom, and she had left three messages for me so i knew there was something wrong. >> i received a call from my mom. i didn't answer but then i got a text message from her, which is very unusual. >> and i called her back. and i said, what happened? and she says, it's ben. he died. i just didn't have any of the information. >> i finally said, how did this happen? and she said he went to sleep the night before and he just never woke up. >> he's always smiling, every picture he's smiling. >> for day ben gupta's family was desperate for answers. what killed him? he was only 28 years old. he had recently been given a clean bill of health. how could he just not wake up? >> and then the thought went through my mind that maybe it was some sort of a brain aneurism or something must have happened. >> but his father was in fo
who makes the laws. caller: president obama could not put anything in there before his term going out. i have been following this for years. usually the incoming president has bills that the previous president left. on this president's way out, congress would not let him put any deals in. they put enough in there to finish his term. host: the president has been reelected and will be back in next year. but i appreciate the call. i want to point to an obituary in the new york times today on the death of warren redmon. he dies at age 82. the sometimes combative centrist republican senator from new hampshire. you will be seeing those obituaries in several papers today. coming up next, a top supreme court reporter david savage will join us to talk about some of that the-profile cases an accord will be taking up. and later, phyllis bennis will take a closer look at where u.s. troops are deployed around the world, and not just in the middle east. first, turning back to warren rudman. he was a moderate republican senator from new hampshire. he was 82 years old when he died. he sat down with c
was a good master and that jefferson's son-in-law who ran things around here when jefferson was away, cornel raldolf was in charge he was an executive overseer. he was a good master. it in going through the record i found that he -- when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter and sold him to overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac didn't mention that in his memoir, why? i really don't know. maybe he told his white interviewer and the interviewer didn't want to write it down. maybe isaac didn't want to say anything that would hurt the feelings of a white man. maybe it didn't -- maybe it hasn't left my impression. we don't know. it's not there. it leads one to realize that there is a lot in these accounts that we really don't know, and that the psychology possible distortion that took place under slavery that we are still wrestling with. another person's memoir who i spent a lot of time with was peters to et. he left two memoirs he gave newspaper interviews in the late 1800s. he was born here and he was one of the slaves who was aucti
, there are people who fear islamic law, there are people who want the old days to come back and hosni mubarak, so, it's a really mixed bag of protesters and the question is, will they have-- will they have the momentum and the willpower to keep coming out day after day and able to stick around, rick? >> steve harrigan streaming live from cairo, thank you very much. >> get some background on president morsi's rise to power. he was elected in 2012 with a strong mandate winning more than 51% of the vote, as leader of the muslim brotherhood, he was the first islamist elected to be head of an arab state. from the outset morsi had been plagued with allegations that his party wanted to be in the political landscape and a moral code based on strict islamic principles. >> there are signs that things are beginning to get back to normal as israel begins to ease border restrictions into gaza after a cease-fire agreement with hamas the other day and that ended eight days of cross border fighting which claimed the lives of 166 palestinians and six israeli civilians. as part of a truce brokered by egypt israel
the election, many republicans admitting obamacare is the law of the land, but did they speak too soon? there's big healthcare law news tonight, and that is next. in two minutes, it's happening again. but this time it's not charlie sheen ranting against "two and a half men." which of the show's stars is now telling viewers stop watching. you'll see for yourself two minutes away. before copd... i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bnchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbirt may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, d some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. with copd, i thou
that the seattle law is consistent with the first amendment. and, colleagues, i also want to mention that i'm still committed to finding policies that reduce yellow page blight and i'm working with the city attorney to hopefully draft new legislation to find alternate approaches to achieving the same goal. at this time, colleague, i hope you will be able to support this legislation in light of the 9th circuit. >> thank you. thank you, president chiu. supervisor wiener. >> i thank you and i want to thank president chiu for having pursued this legislation which i was happy to support and i was really saddened by the ninth slur circuit ruling. it seems that our federal courts more and more are fetishizing commercial and corporate speech. i fundamentally disagree with that. with that said, the current law is what it is and i will be reluctantly supporting this suspension and hope to revive legislation in the not too distant future. >> thank you. let's open this up for public comment. is there anyone from the public that would like to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. so, r colleagues, there
invasion under the common law -- >> it isn't the sniffing in the abstract, it's the sniffing at this point. the sniffing at a person's front door, right? >> well, i mean, that's true, your honor, but i think if it wasn't a search for the police officer to walk up there and sniff and report smelling live marijuana, then it wasn't a search when frankie walked up there and alerted to the presence of an illegal narcotic. >> well, i didn't say it wouldn't be a search if the police officer himself did that if he went there with the intention of smelling at the door. he's going there to search, and he shouldn't be on the -- [inaudible] to search. >> i think it's been conceded in this case, at least it was below, that the officer could walk up there, report the smell of marijuana and that that was not a search. >> mr. garre, this is what we said, and i'm just going to read it. we said: we think that obtaining by sense-enhancing technology any information regarding the interior of the home that could not otherwise have been obtained without physical intrusion into a constitutionally-protected area
, as always, thank you. coming up after the election, many republicans admitting obamacare is the law of the land, but did they speak too soon? there's big healthcare law news tonight, and that is next. in two minutes, it's happening again. but this time it's not charlie sheen ranting against "two and a half men." which of the show's stars is now telling viewers stop watching. you'll see for yourself two minutes away. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. and always have. so does aarp,
, i cannot give that to you. because actually, by law, by law, the secret service have to protect the president, first lady, and the family. and in our day -- daddy was vice president, and that is when they changed the law. imagine what it would have been like if they had not changed the law. at that time, it was just the president. and the law was changed to include the vice president. imagine what it would have been like in dallas. but lucy did not get her day free from the secret service. >> she could get almost anything but not that. you had many unique experiences. i believe the only prom held in the white house and one of the very few weddings. >> it was very exciting. as a matter of fact, the previous big wedding was alice longworth. princess alice, they called her. in our day, she was the cat's meow in washington. she said -- she had a pillow that said "if you do not have anything nice to say to anybody, come and sit next to me." [laughter] she was wonderful to listen to as long as she wasn't saying anything bad about you. but she came to our wedding. i mean, she was fasci
mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt. what happens if they fail to reach any kind of compromise here? >> reporter: well for the past four days
above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n. ambassador, susan rice, for secretary of state. at least until they get more answers about her comments about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. president obama has not yet even nominated her. but the white house says she is enormously qualified. senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte say they're even more troubled now after meeting with ambassador rice. the attack on libya on september 11 killed the u.s. ambassador, cries stevens and three other americans. five days later, ambassador rice went on the sunday talk shows and said u.s. officials believed it was a spontaneous reaction to protest over an anti-islam video. not a preplanned terrorist attack. first the controversy was over wheth
residents in every state to secede from the united states. a georgetown university law professor is our guest. "washington journal" is next. host: federal officials including lawmakers on capitol hill are looking at how to slash wait times and possibly boost early voting. that will be hours subject for the first section of this edition of "the washington journal." for the first 45 minutes we will be talking to you about remedies to speed up the voting process. the numbers are on the screen. you can reach out to us by social media. @cspanwj. the conversation constantly going on on facebook -- facebook.com/cspan. we begin this morning with a look at the lead story in "the baltimore sun." pushed to speed of voting processes is the headline. he writes -- we want to find out from you, our viewers and listeners, your thoughts and remedies on speeding up the voting process. more from the article in "the baltimore sun." the article goes on to talk about a bill being proposed by virginia by senator mark warner. it says -- we would like to show you a little bit more about what the presiden
constitutional law. host: does fighting cyber crime violate the law? caller: the bill that is actually being passed to create cyber police or cyber security -- this deal that created violates the constitutional laws. host: we have a couple of bills on the table, but we also seeing the white house. we mentioned that the president has asked for the military to act more aggressively. guest: obviously, i do not have all of the details on this particular bill because it is classified. however, i can tell you, have spent nine years until the military. i have been a part of a lot of operations. in every case, the legal opinion was always an issue that was never passed over to ensure that not just u.s. citizens' rights were in storage but also the rights of the international. i cannot comment on the bill. i have not seen it. i can tell the historically i have never come across a situation where the law was something that was ignored. host: the reason you have not seen it is because it is a secret directive that this point. "the washington post" goes on to say -- give us a sense of how the government
of next year that is built into the current law, the so-called fiscal clef. the automatic tax increases and spending cuts that make up the fiscal cliff absent of offsetting changes proposes a substantial threat to the recovery. indeed by the reckoning of the congressional budget office, the cbo, and that of many outside observers, a fiscal shock of that size would send the economy toppling back into the recession. second, early in the new year it will be necessary to improve and increase in the federal and debt limit to avoid any possibility of a catastrophic default on the nation's treasury securities and other obligations. as you recall the threat of default in the summer of 2011 fueled the economic uncertainty even though an agreement was ultimately reached. the failure to reach an agreement this time around can impose an even heavier economic and financial cost. as the fiscal policy makers face these decisions with the two objectives in mind, first as i think it is widely appreciated by now, the federal budget is on an unsustainable path. the budget deficit which peaked at about 10%
convention said. the law of our complex is that, so that's what the rules of engagement. i make that a subject brigadier, what do you say? >> everything is more or less on it. chance of seven or collateral damage is ruled out very quickly. that does alter the judgment call. >> can i just go back, you talked about whether the are selling caches and so on, that investigations take place. as i understand if there's an ied, it may well be an investigation of another sort take place to see if there's forensics and do something about apprehending people, prosecuting them and so on. these investigations you describe, they presumably form part of a broader investigation and a discussion with the committee about the conflict in which incidents happen, is that right? if it's not right explain please what is right and who was involved in that process. on the afghans involved? of the afghan police involved? civil society involves? give us a bit of an insight into what those investigations would look like. >> let me start. whenever there is an incident, there is an investigation. it is a joi
in a health care law. hobby lobby denying their request to block the controversial contraceptive mandate. hobby lobby does not want to provide its employees with insurance that covers the morning after pill. angela mcgowan is a fox news political analyst and ryan clayton is a democratic consultant and they join us on this thanksgiving. happy thanksgiving. >> should every american, including business owners, should they be able to have health care without forfeiting their privileges believes? >> hobby lobby is not a religious organization. but they have talked about biblical principles. yes, every american should be able to have prosperity without forsaking religious beliefs. heather: the government puts appellants to an impossible choice. either give up or pay millions in fines. is that what this comes down to? >> we really need to look at this from the perspective of the parents and women who are having children. parents should be in control of how many children they have in this country. not a boss in america -- it seems like someone to let the boss make that decision for them. you kno
comply with the law. >> greta: if it is set up with the state, it's going to cost you money? >> i don't have much control at the state level because there is still rule making that is not done. really the federal mandates we get run and get stuck with the price tag. that is great concern with already an overburdensomesome medicaid program. we wanted to know what we're getting in to if there is no answers. >> greta: what does your democratic legislation want in this general session? >> they want a state based. the obama administration very much wants the governors to start a state based exchange so we can run it. we'll technically they want us to expand medicaid, not so much the exchange. we're going to have some type of exchange the supreme court ruled they can't penalizeize us by existing dollars in we don't expand medicaid. it's already a huge budget buster. we want to have a good safety net for the poor but if we don't have dramatic reform of medicaid which is broken system, expanding it would be irresponsible and would break our budgets. president obama himself said four years ago
right would have been so quietly obedient to constitutional law. there's something out there on the right right now that is still uneasy with this defeat. searching desperately for an explanation of how the conservative caterpillar they had right there in their hands became the liberal butterfly now happily fluttering and, yes, defiantly free of them, and they don't like it one bit. i'm joined by rick hertzberg and "the huffington post's" howard fineman. rick, i wonder about this. this sense they have of almost royal ruling class identity with the white house. what do you make of it and their attitude before and after the election? they really weren't going to lose, and they haven't really in some strange way because they got the house. >> yeah. well, this attitude has built up over time over the years. they didn't really think bill clinton was legitimate because ross perot they thought cost him the election. they thought that obama's original election was a freak on account of bush being such a terrible president, and they were not equipped to deal with this defeat, an
to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions coming one day after egypt help broker a cease-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil in egypt. we will have a live report from washington. >> gregg: new signs of tough challenges ahead for gaza. number two leader of hamas now saying the group will not stop arming itself. a commented suggesting that indirect negotiations on the border deal could be very difficult. in the meantime, life at the gaza strip return
here thanks to oscar corral and his mother-in-law and some others i found out that the real little havana in latvia is hialeah. but it's not very little anymore. about 225,000 people. and that was the population of miami within the city limits. >> within miami proper? just over 400,000. >> i thought little havana was around -- [inaudible] and if you wield a cup of cuban coffee, you watch the old men play checkers across the street, you'd been there. [laughter] >> well, speaking of oscar, you have a incredible reputation for the amount of research that you do when you're writing a book. how do you compare the research you did for "charlotte simmons" or "man in full" to the research you did in miami for "blood," and i don't think you've ever done this before, so what was it like having a camera following you around during your research? i know that when i was in office, oscar corral followed me around all the time, and i didn't particularly like it, so -- [laughter] >> you'll see for yourself what happened to me when oscar followed me around. he's on after we arement the one thing i
believe it will take up challenges to the fert defense of marriage act which is a law signed by president clinton and the part being challenged is the one that says as far as the federal government is concerned, marriage can only consist between a man and a woman. what the law means is that in the states that allow same sex marriage, the federal government doesn't recognize them. if the challengers were successful and that part were struck down, it wouldn't mean the states have to grant same sex marriage, it would sim mr. i mean in the states where marriage is legal the federal government would have to recognize the marriage tax consequences, federal benefits and so forth. the court will also consider the challenge to the whole question of whether states must grant same sex marriage. that's the big california case, the prop 108 case and less certain the court will take that case, i think. those are the two biggies that we'll watch. we may or may not find out on friday whether they will take them. we'll find out friday or the following monday. >> there is also some late breaking news in ju
the constitution was passed, i can understand the power of the legislature. but today i think any law passed by the legislature should be turned into a referendum and voted on by all of us with on- line computers and free long- distance phone calls. let the people speak approval of what the congress passes or veto it. host: do you think enough people would get involved in the state conversation like that? caller: i do, on the issues they are passing now in congress, like spending, spending what they don't have. they're spending my money. the obamacare would never have passed in front of the american people when it was originally proposed and passed by a democratic house and executive branch. i think we have a runaway government that is in too much of my daily living and business. host: on twitter -- you can send us your tweet. in other news, we told you about the egyptian president, what the baltimore sun is calling as startling call or grab weakening the courts and freeing him from judicial oversight committee deepening political intrigue in the arab world's most populous nation. next to th
into law in 2011. if republicans are willing to let the bush tax cuts for the rich expire as part of a larger framework, it's going to be not just a quiet christmas in washington, but a smooth one for the economy. i should say that we invited mr. norquist on the show e to explain why his pledge will hold, but he declined. so joining me now are two folks who have experience watching the pledge distort american politics and scotch many a deal. robert riech and now the president of the center for american progress, thank you both for joining me tonight. >> great to be with you. >> i want to begin with you, robert. does this feel different to you? pretty much the the first thing you guys did was propose a budget to reduce the deficit and it included a lot of tax increases and you didn't get one republican vote because of them. do you think republicans are cracking now? do you feel something different in the air? >> undoubtedly something different is in the air. it's called an election victory. but i will believe when i see it that republicans beginning to agree to a tax increase. grov
, they are mandated by law -- mr. reagan and his troops, when they read it so security in 1983-1986, they came up with federal employees retirement system. they were wanting to eliminate several services altogether. that was because of the benefits. if you have $1,000 so security retirement for your benefit ♪s. ts, it would offset your benefits by $1,000 also. you're supposed to get say 1275 and you get $1,000 worth of social security, they reduce your disability retirement by $1,000. host: got it. ♪ caller it doesn't leave you a whole lot oin there. there were a lot of private, wealthy people who cut benefits to the people who are served by them and chop it up. you figure 300 different companies are running it, they are not going to be able run it efficiently and work together. guest: the caller points out that there is a lot of this dispute that has to do with the sort of basic mathematics of benefits that are going to be owed to the postal service workers that will be retiring in the next few years. really, the crunch time is really going to be over the next 5-10 years. they are trying to
skirt immigration laws. immigration reform is the right thing to do as well as economically smart thing to do. children should not have to live in the fear of their parents' deportation every day of their lives. and the most vulnerable people in our society should not be subject to harassment. i am truly appreciative of the support we have received from the urban league and other african-american leaders on this issue. i know there have been tensions in the past. i believe like reverend dr. martin luther king jr., when we have tensions we have to embrace them so we can come together. let's get a solution on this issue. when we come together, we can figure this out. i had the privilege of marching earlier this year in the annual march from selma, montgomery. it was an incredible feeling. there i was with congressman john lewis, someone who has an historic role from the original march and so many others. it was ethel kennedy. it was reverend al sharpton. there were hispanic leaders there, including myself. everyone came together. when we came over the bridge, i got a glimpse into what the
coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends dember 7th. so now's the time. visit care.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >> after agreeing to a cease-fire, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu explains. >> agreed with president obama that together with the united states we will fight against these weapons of terror much of which comes from iran. >> alisyn: our next guest says that jihadist rulers can't it be allowed to get nukes because israel is a one bomb count country. hi, clifford, what do you mean by a one bomb country? >> people don't realize how small israel is, it's smaller than djabouti and the muslim countries around it are 600 times its size with about 60 times the population. what's been said by iranian rulers, it would take actually one bomb, one bomb to wipe out the entire country and if they did that and israel rehe al yates, more than a billion muslims left, why not. >> i've heard that israel is the size of new jersey and carries so much weight in the world, but it's that small. so what
vii of the civil rights act, which as you know is our antidiscrimination law. under. the supervisors is imbued with the employer's authority. an employer can be held liable if a nonsupervisor employee harasses another employee. but it's tougher to prove. you have to shout employer knew or should have known about the harassment and failed to act. maida vance brought this lawsuit against ball state university. she's an african american woman working in the dining services division of the university, claimed she was harassed by a white coworker, was slapped on the head, blocked at the elevator, racial epithets were used such as "sambo" and "buckwheat" in her presence. she complained and finally brought her lawsuit against the university. she lost in the lower courts. the lower court, federal appellate court, said this coworker was not a supervisor, and took the definition that is probably the most restrictive-- that is, the supervisor has to be somebody who can make a tangible employment decision, such as hiring and firing. >> brown: today it made its way to the supreme court, and her l
the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> congress returned to work today after a grueling and extended thanksgiving vacation, and to mark this solemn event, we're introducing a new series on the nation's top lawmakers. we're calling it "red, white, and true." and today we focus on the magnificent republican representative of tennessee, dr. scott -- >> i'm the conservative pro-life republican doctor, scott desjesrlais. >> as a conservative pro-life republican doctor, the congressman rode the tea party wave to washington just two years ago. but things have gotten a little tricky since then. you see, in divorce proceedings released after election day, this severely conservative pro-life republican doctor admitted to having sexual relationships with multiple women, including two of his
and child labor laws and it took four years, until 1944 when we invented the word teenager and the birth of 17 magazine. there is some irony that youth was invented by somebody in their 60's. the main lesson really is that the stages of life were essentially responsive to problems. they were solutions and it's ironic that g. stanley hal himself, the inventor of youth, who proposed 20 years later a new stage of life between midlife and old age. arguing that he had actually made a mistake. he should have invented the stage this stage iv people like himself. he promptly passed away a year later but in writing about this period he had a a set of beautiful images and insight which i think actually makes a lot of sense almost 100 years later. he described as period is an indian summer and he said human beings didn't reach the height of their capacity and tell a shadow started slanting eastward, which i love. essentially has idea was that more and more people were reaching a point where they have the benefits of experience in the capacity to do something with it. wrote a book a couple of years
father-in-law feedback. my father-in-law wants you on current tv for the first time yesterday. you were good but you're too skinny. the men in my family not into the skinny women. diane in lansing michigan. her father is not that into me. >> he's not interested in seeing your scrunch apparently. >> stephanie: requests to see the aforementioned -- >> scrunch. >> stephanie: thank you. okay. if he's new to the show, maybe he doesn't know that i'm not that into -- you know, anyone with a [ bleep ] i don't really care that he thinks -- >> you're not into richard. >> stephanie: chris, yes? >> according to urban dictionary -- there are several definitions. a scrunch is when a girl's bikini bottom goes up her butt. it can mean a hot chick. or scrunch can mean a scrotum with one testicle. [ buzzer ] [ laughter ] >> stephanie: i beg your part. i have not had that since like 1974. that is offensive to me. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: all right. i have two holiday gifts. one for me. one for jim. here we go. [
're going to go out there and break the law they will be out there in force. reporting live, terisa estacio, kron 4. >> some of these roads are taking to the air with over 100,000 people were expected to push through s f o just today. this is a live look. there were long delays yesterday and today was a much different story. dan kerman. >> what a difference a day makes on this day before thanksgiving s f o have mostly sunny skies. that translated into most flights running on time. >> everything has been dismissed so far. >> everything has been great if it ever is been -- smoot so far. we are on our way home. >> these weather conditions were great. >> we got here early, panicked, the whole bit! [laughter] >> however, it is fine. >> these people were connecting and even they were finding the bright side. >> we are going to go to atlanta but the las vegas connection is it delayed. >> we are on time out of san francisco. >> this relatively cease and travel allowed people to focus. >> i am looking for to spend thanksgiving with my family, my sister-in-law, has spent. turkey and not having to coo
♪ >> a reading from the book of exodus. moses was keeping the flock of his father-in-law. he led his flock beyond the wilderness and came to the mountain of god. the angel of the lord appeared to him and a flame of fire out of a bush. he looked, and the bush was blazing, yet it was not consumed. and then moses said, i must turn aside and look at this great site and see why the bush is not burned up. when the lord saw that he had turned aside to see, god called to him out of the bush. moses, moses. and he said, here i am. and then god said, come no closer. remove the sandals from your feet. the place on which you are standing is holy ground. he said further, i am day god -- the god of your father, the god of abraham, the god of isac, and the god of jacob. -- god of isaac, and the god of jacob. and moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at god. then the lord said, i have observed the misery of my people who are in egypt. i have heard their cries on account of their taskmasters. i know their sufferings. i have come to deliver them from the egyptians. and to bring them up out of that land, to
of becoming the attack. >> plus a shocking admission from the law enforcement team that investigated the casey anthony's case. how could the sheriffs missed this evidence? >> heather: hour legal panel weighs in on teen convicted of manslaughter. he has to serve time but not behind bars but instead behind stained glass. >> gregg: first we begin with a fox news alert. new word on deadly attack on the headquarters of egypt's muslim brotherhood. the party of egyptian president mohammed morsi as he agrees to new talks about over his controversial decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. steve harrigan is streaming live from care row. what can you tell us. >> details of the offices of the muslim brotherhood. attack happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)